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Home  > News  > Remembrance: The Crusader
 

Remembrance: The Crusader

November 09 2010

What do you think of when you look at this photo?

Photo of The Crusader sculpture by Gerry Judah showing a seven metre white cross with what look like bombed buildings attached to it.



It's actually a sculpture called The Crusader by the artist Gerry Judah.

It is now on show at the Imperial War Museum, North until November 2011.


All photos unless otherwise stated: © David Barbour






Gerry Judah made The Crusader to remember the wars and conflict that are going on in the world today.

Photo showing the male artist Gerry Judah wearing a black tshirt and trousres and hat that have been spattered by white paint from making his sculpture which is in the background of the photo.

Close up photo of The Crusader sculpture by Gerry Judah showing a seven metre white cross with what look like bombed buildings attached to it.






The Crusader is seven metres tall - that's as tall as a house - and it's covered with shapes that are like buildings that have been bombed.



It's Remembrance Day on November 11. Click on the link to find out why we have Remembrance Day.




Photo © Jon Pratty

Photo showing a field of little wooden crosses, some with written messages on them, and with Remembrance Day red poppies on them.

Showing detail from

Why a cross can be so powerful in art

In the Christian religion, people believe that Jesus Christ was the son of God and the cross is where Jesus was crucified (put to death).

To see this painting of the crucifixion (Christ dying on the cross) in the National Gallery's online collection, just click on the link.

Christians use symbols of the cross to remember that Jesus died so that he could take away people's sins if they say sorry for bad things they have done and follow him instead.

Details of painting above: The Crucifixion: Central Panel, Probably 1525-35, Circle of Pieter Coecke van Aalst, © National Gallery, London

By Rachel Hayward